Is Homosexuality Still Considered a Sin?

Despite recent societal advances, there is still a vast amount of hatred towards those individuals who identify as being gay, lesbian, or bisexual. A proportionate amount of this discrimination towards the LGBT community comes, quite surprisingly, from those who identify as being religious.
Now, I don’t want to paint the picture that all Church members go around bashing us gays on the heads with their bibles. I am fully aware that the lack of acceptance of the LGBT community is only demonstrated by a small group of religious people. However, it is unfortunate that the minority who show this lack of support towards those individuals who are homosexual seems to include some pretty influential people, the head of the Catholic Church being a prime example.
During a speech given at Capitol Hill at the end of last month, Pope Francis spoke of his concerns, “for the family, which is threatened, perhaps as never before, from within and without.” He then went on to say that “fundamental relationships are being called into question,” causing many to conclude that his comments were a thinly veiled dig at the recent legalisation of same sex marriage across America.
This is not the first time that his comments on marriage have led to speculation that he does not accept same sex couples as, last November, he spoke of the “complementarity of man and woman” and emphasised that this was “at the root of marriage and family.” He concluded this talk by saying he hoped his words inspire those seeking, “to support and strengthen the union of man and woman in marriage,” showing a blatant disregard towards those same sex couples who wished to be wed.
Although, it could be argued that Pope Francis was simply talking about marriage in a more ‘traditional’ sense, it cannot be ignored that our society is now extremely diverse; therefore, looking at our culture in a ‘traditional’ way is extremely problematic.
The way in which the LGBT community were not acknowledged in these comments indicates a complete lack of support, and perhaps even a lack of acceptance, towards them as it seems to imply that, in his opinion, the sanctity of marriage should have remained a privilege available explicitly for heterosexual couples.
If the head of the Catholic Church can display what seems like complete ignorance towards the LGBT community and continues to refuse to even acknowledge their basic rights, then how can we expect those who look up to him to begin to support and accept those who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual or trans.
As long as these influential figures maintain a homophobic mindset, they are enabling those individuals who lead by their example to continue meeting the LGBT community with hostility and discrimination, using their religion as justification for doing so.

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5 thoughts on “Is Homosexuality Still Considered a Sin?

  1. Protestants have been saying for 500 years that Catholics are stuck in their ways and bass akwards. My question is why is them accepting you or not an issue? They don’t accept my belief system and we launch anathemas at each other and leave it at that. As long as they don’t burn me at the stake I can care less what they think; I think my response is why do you care?
    It seems selfish or totalitarian to want everyone to be accepting of your ideals, etc. Why is their view worse than yours? Why does their view on anything matter? I’d happily sing “kick the pope” with you…
    It’s fine and dandy to argue things, I’m just curious whats the ultimate end game in this post? There’s nothing in it to illicit caring.

    And if you’re not a believer why does sin matter? The only thing I can think of is you want a social identity that comes from group membership with those guys OK. And then I ask why give them such power?

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  2. For me its less about accepting a belief system, (I wouldn’t really call being gay a ‘belief’), and more about just trying to accept people for who they are without demonstrating hatred.

    I’m not religious and nor are the majority of my friends/family so the opinions of anti gay religious groups don’t directly impact my life, however, they do impact the lives of those gay people who are beaten/disowned etc, (which is common, by the way), by their religious families when they come out.

    I don’t condone hatred towards any marginalised group and if that seems ‘selfish or totalitarian’ of me then I will happily take that.

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  3. I am not religious, but I know the Bible states that man should be with woman. Therefore it is no surprise that the Pope does not recognise same sex marriage. He would be changing his belief and not following the bible. Catholics have the right to believe what they want to. They should however not demonise people especially when being gay is not a choice but the way you are born. I think you could attack Catholism all day long, but they too should be able to live the way they want as long as they are not hurting others. every religion is attacked in some way or another, but it the people following the faith that are the ones hurt others, demonise people, abuse others etc.. the catholic church has been guilty of many of those things, but this is not their teaching it is humans interpreting the bible the way they want.

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    • The bible also condemns eating the meat from certain animals, wearing ripped clothing and cutting your hair to name just a few “rules.” Many people who are religious choose to ignore these parts as they seem outdated and not relevant to today’s culture so why not the parts about homosexuality? I believe people are entitled to whatever opinions and beliefs they want but I find the double standards that many religious people have laughable. I said in a previous comment that it does not really have much impact on my life personally as the majority of my friends and family are atheist but I really do feel for those who are gay and are born into families who will not accept them because of their religion. Again, you raise really valid points!

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      • Thank you! I would also point to the fact that there are starving people in the world and Catholic buildings are worth a fortune. The Vatican is worth billions! It’s crazy! It is always the people not the religion. I think it is clear that it is not a lifestyle choice. If it were why would so many choose a life where they commit suicide. Go to prison take medication to render them completely sexless, are attacked, lose jobs, hide away.. no one choose that.

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